Unlike the ITO charter, the GATT did not need congressional approval. Technically, the GATT was a 1934 agreement, in accordance with the provisions of the U.S. Reciprocal Trade Act. The interests of developing countries have inspired both the overall structure of the agreement and certain articles. In particular, the objective of facilitating the increasing participation of developing countries in trade in services has been enshrined in the preamble to the agreement and is based on the provisions of Article IV. In particular, this article obliges Members to negotiate specific commitments to strengthen the national service capacity of developing countries; Improving developing countries` access to distribution channels and information networks; and liberalizing market access in the areas of interest to these countries. The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) on the protection of human, animal or plant health was so vague that many countries used “health requirements” as trade barriers. These concerns were taken into account in the rules on multilateral trade relations of the 1994 Uruguay Round, which brought food and agricultural products into the set of international trade rules. It led to the adoption of the SPS Enforcement Agreement (Laws, Regulations and Procedures) and an updated Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (OTC), which ensured fair and effective international trade on the basis of equity and access to global food markets. These agreements should define the conditions for transparency, equivalence, regionalization, harmonisation and national sovereignty when countries establish regulatory measures to ensure food security, consumer protection and plant and animal health. Unjustified health measures as impediments to trade have been discouraged unless such measures have scientific evidence and risk assessment principles.

Through the World Trade Organization (WTO), there is a scientifically sound approach to negotiating and resolving conflicts to prevent food security from being an intractable barrier to trade. The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) is a multilateral agreement regulating international trade. In addition to facilitating applied tariff reductions, GATT`s contribution to trade liberalization includes “the commitment of extended-term tariff reductions (which became more sustainable in 1955), the definition of universality of non-discrimination through the treatment of the most favoured nation (MFN) and the status of domestic treatment, ensuring greater transparency in trade policies and creating a forum for negotiations and the peaceful settlement of bilateral disputes. All of these have helped to streamline trade policy and reduce trade barriers and political uncertainty. [4] In May 1963, the ministers agreed on three negotiating objectives: among the original GATT members[19][20] Lebanon[21] and the LICO Yugoslavia did not re-enter the WTO. Given that Yugoslavia (renamed in Serbia and Montenegro and later two shared accession negotiations) is not recognised as a direct successor to the SFRY; Therefore, its application is considered new (non-GATT). On 4 May 2010, the WTO General Council decided to set up a working group to review Syria`s application for WTO membership. [22] [23] The WTO parties terminated the 1947 GATT formal agreement on 31 December 1995. Montenegro became a member in 2012, while Serbia is in the decision-making phase and is expected to become a member of the WTO in the future. The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) is a legal agreement between many countries whose overall objective was to promote international trade by removing or removing trade barriers, such as tariffs or quotas.