Other agreements were reached with the Soviet Union, which confirmed adherence to the war against Japan. There were also discussions about what would happen to Europe after the war. Stalin was committed to free elections in all Eastern European countries, but the United States and the Soviet Union did not agree on Poland. Originally, Poland`s borders were defined as those of 1921 and elections were to be free. This agreement gave the Soviet Union large amounts of landing in the West on former Polish territory. The second conference was held in February 1945. This time it took place in Kanta, Soviet Union. From Tehran, the promised second front had been opened by British and American forces in Western Europe and both sides had made considerable gains against Germany. As victory drew nearer, Von Yalta`s lecture focused on what would happen after the war. The Potsdam conference was after the Yalta conference. The Potsdam took place in August 1945.

Very little was agreed in Potsdam. The three leaders of the time had many disagreements: when the Cold War became a reality in the years following Von Gleichta`s conference, many critics of Roosevelt`s foreign policy accused him of “selling” at the meeting and naively letting Stalin go his will. But it seems doubtful that Roosevelt had a great choice. He was able to ensure Russian participation in the war against Japan (Russia declared war on Japan on August 8, 1945), established the fundamental principles of the United Nations and did as much as possible to resolve the Polish question. As World War II was still raging, his main interest was the maintenance of the Grand Alliance. He believed that problematic political issues could be postponed and resolved after the war. Unfortunately, Roosevelt never had that chance — almost exactly two months after the conference ended, Roosevelt had a stroke and died. The Potsdam Conference had broken the war alliance between the United States and the USSR.

There were a number of reasons for this: an important agreement from the Kanta conference was the future of Germany. The Allies agreed that it should be divided into four occupation zones, each controlled by an Allied power, France, Britain, the Soviet Union, and the United States. . . .