I agree that the language of the agreement seems ambiguous and a little misleading. My interpretation is that they recognize schools accredited directly by the agency that is CDAC, and not indirectly by another agency (ADC). In your previous article, it says: “In addition, the following general dentistry programs are also considered accredited: as of March 30, 2010, general dentistry programs will be accredited by the CDAC or the Australian Dental Council (ADC). I think “or” may indicate that Australian schools can be accredited by CDA and recognized as accredited, but it has not really been accredited by the agency that is cdac. This sounds very arbitrary, but it could explain why CODA does not see Australian schools as accredited by CDAC. I found this in an American dental forum. This contribution was made in 2010, when the agreement entered into force. I think that means australian graduates can`t practice in the U.S. right now. I have seen that some Australian schools are seeking CODA (US) accreditation, which can change: in 2012, the ADC actually approached CODA to reach a mutual agreement with the United States (much like Canada) and was rejected by CODA. You can read it here. Has anyone else noticed that the Saudi school of dentists, King Abdulaziz University, is CODA accredited? Ask yourself why a certain university in this region gets CODA accreditation.

New Zealand has been trying for years to have accredited its CODA dental school:https:/www.ada.org/~/media/CODA/Files/coda_minutes_summer_2014.pdf (page 32/36) www.ada.org/~/media/CODA/Files/coda_minutes_Feb2016.pdf (22/24) Ask yourself if they will consider CODA accreditation. www.dentalboard.gov.au/documents/default.aspx?record=WD12%2F9231&dbid=AP&chksum=6t%2F6Ast3Ziy8wqTX1q%2FNTg%3D%3D Recirprocity`s agreements aggravate saturation, but cities were already quite saturated, not thin and dandy before people studied dentistry outside of LA/US in significant numbers. This article, which discusses the oversupply of dentists, was published in 2013, 3 years after the agreement with Australia was concluded. At that time, there would not have been enough Australian graduates to make a critical contribution to saturation. You can still practice in the United States if you are willing to take a two-year international bridge program at a dental school in the United States. For clarification, I emailed the ADA Accreditation Department whether the ADC and CDAC agreements had an indirect effect. They told me: “Your message was conveyed to me because I am the accreditation officer for international accreditation. The reciprocity agreement between the CDAC and Australia does not cover the United States and the Commission d`accessation dentaire (CODA). The reciprocity agreement that CODA has with CDAC applies only to Canadian programs. CODA has guidelines and procedures for the accreditation of established international undergraduate education programs.

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